Juneteenth

Juneteenth (a combination of the words June and nineteenth) was designated a federal holiday in 2021, becoming a national celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, Union troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, and freed the roughly 250,000 still enslaved people living in the newly defeated Confederate state. Taking place a full two and a half years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation and two months after the end of the Civil War, the day—also known as Freedom Day or Jubilee Day—marked the end of slavery in the United States as Texas was one of the last states to free enslaved people. 

Presented by the San Bruno Public Library, the San Bruno Culture and Arts Commission, the Redwood City Public Library, and the South San Francisco Public Library, who have collaborated to present this series of programs celebrating Juneteenth.  

IN-PERSON PROGRAMS


Kid Makers: Juneteenth Crafts
Saturday, June 4, 2022, 2 PM - 3 PM
Makerspace at the Downtown Redwood City Public Library   

Join the Juneteenth, Freedom Day celebration!  Create a replica of the Juneteenth flag and other crafts and activities in the Redwood City Public Library’s Makerspace. Hosted by the Redwood City Public Library. For more information, visit Kid Makers: Juneteenth Crafts.

Juneteenth Celebration
Saturday, June 11, 2022, 12 PM - 3 PM
San Bruno City Park, near the Baseball Fields, San Bruno 

The San Bruno Culture and Arts Commission and the San Bruno Public Library invite you to celebrate Juneteenth in person at San Bruno City Park. Come enjoy music, community, crafts, and opening remarks from community leaders. Feel free to bring your own picnic! Catered lunch has "sold out." Sponsored by the San Bruno Culture and Arts Commission.

VIRTUAL PROGRAMS


Celebrate Juneteenth
Thursday, June 16, 2022, 6:30 PM
Register for this event

Although Juneteenth may be a “new” observance to some, this freedom celebration has a long history among Black Texans and their family members who have migrated across the country.  Join local poet Lois Fried for an evening combining history, poetry, and artwork to explore the legacy, traditions, and future of this important national holiday. Co-Sponsored by the San Bruno Public Library and Redwood City Public Library. Hosted by the Redwood City Public Library.

African American Migrations to the San Francisco Bay Area
Monday, June 20, 2022, 6:30 PM
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Author Jan Batiste Adkins (African Americans of San Francisco, African Americans of San Jose and Santa Clara County) will discuss the history of African American migrations to the San Francisco Bay Area and share historic photos and stories documenting these communities. Sponsored by the South San Francisco Public Library and the San Bruno Public Library; hosted by the South San Francisco Public Library.

EXPLORE MORE!
 

Check out our Staff Picks Reading and Watching:

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We Are Not Strangers Here: African American Histories in Rural California
Visit this touring exhibition at the Society of California Pioneers in San Francisco.

Listen to a series of podcasts exploring the stories revealed in We Are Not Strangers Here: African American Histories in Rural California exhibition, created by Cal Ag Roots:

Episode 1: Freedom Chasers: Early Black Settlers and the California Dream

Episode 2: Hidden Roots: Uncovering the Legacies of African American Homesteaders in California

Episode 3: Cultivating Change: African American Homesteaders, Innovators, and Civic Leaders

Episode 4: Independent Settlements: Building Black Communities in Rural California

Episode 5: Back to the Land: Allensworth and the Black Utopian Dream

Episode 6: Still Here: Black Farmers and Agricultural Stewardship in the Modern Age

We Are Not Strangers Here is a touring exhibition created through a collaboration between the Cal Ag Roots Project at the California Institute for Rural Studies; Susan Anderson of the California African American Museum; the California Historical Society; Exhibit Envoy; and Dr. Caroline Collins from UC San Diego. It was made possible with support from California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the 11th Hour Project at the Schmidt Family Foundation.